starry

starry analytic lightcurves

Computation of transit and secondary eclipse light curves of exoplanets, light curves of eclipsing binaries, rotational phase curves of exoplanets, light curves of planet-planet and planet-moon occultations, and more. By modeling celestial body surface maps as sums of spherical harmonics, starry does all this analytically and is therefore fast, stable, and differentiable. starry is coded in C++ and wrapped in Python.
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lucky

lucky mapping starspots with tess

This is a work in progress. I'm interested in inverting TESS light curves of low mass stars to figure out what these stars actually look like.
  • github
planetplanet

planetplanet dynamical code

Code for predicting and modeling planet-planet occultations, as well as transit and secondary eclipse light curves, phase curves, mutual transits, and more.
  • github
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  • talk
exoaurora

pale green dot aurorae on proxima b

In this paper, I showed how auroral emission from the habitable zone planet Proxima Centauri b can be used to characterize its orbital properties, its mass, and its atmospheric composition.
  • github
  • paper
Sol-d

sol-d mapping the earth with tess

I analyzed the background Earthshine data in TESS photometry to produce a global, time-variable 2D map of the Earth's cloud cover during July and August of 2018. This was originally submitted to the arXiv as an April fool's paper.
  • github
  • paper
trappist1

trappist-1 search for planet h

I used data from K2 to confirm the period of TRAPPIST-1h, measure the rotation period of the star, and establish that all seven planets in TRAPPIST-1 are in three-body Laplace resonances.
  • github
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mirage

mirage earths m dwarf water loss

In this paper, I showed how the extended pre-main sequence phase of M dwarfs can lead to extreme water loss and the possible buildup of oxygen in the atmospheres of terrestrial planets in the habitable zones of these stars.
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  • talk 1
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about

about about rodrigo

I'm a Flatiron Fellow at the CCA in New York City, working on finding novel ways to detect and characterize exoplanets, particularly those in the habitable zone. I mainly work with light curves from the K2 mission, and I'm gearing up to tackle science with TESS and JWST. Outside the office I love to hike, bike, swim, craft lattes, faulty parallelism, and oxford commas.
everest

everest k2 precision photometry

everest is an open-source pipeline for removing instrumental noise from light curves generated by K2. The code exploits correlations across the pixels on the Kepler CCD to remove systematics introduced by the spacecraft's pointing error, yielding light curves with precision comparable to that of the original Kepler mission.
  • github
  • paper 1
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hecs

hecs habitable evaporated cores

The extended pre-main sequence phase of M dwarfs can drive vigorous hydrodynamic escape from their planets. In this paper, I showed how in some cases, small, gas-rich planets can lose their hydrogen envelopes and form HECs.
  • paper
  • poster
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vplanet

vplanet the virtual planet

VPLANET models the evolution of potentially habitable planets from their formation to the present day, accounting for processes such as stellar evolution, atmospheric escape, climate evolution, etc.
  • paper
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cortex

cortex reproducible science

This is a work in progress. I'm interested in developing ways to make science papers open source, reproducible, and as transparent as possible. Check out the github repo for more information.
  • github